New Testament Survey

Matthew  |  Mark  |  Luke  |  John  |  Acts  |  Romans  |  1 Corinthians  |  2 Corinthians  |  Galatians  |  Ephesians  |  Philippians  |  Colossians  |  1 Thessalonians  |  2 Thessalonians  |  1 Timothy  |  2 Timothy  |  Titus  |  Philemon  |  Hebrews  |  James  |  1 Peter  |  2 Peter  |  1 John  |  2 John  |  3 John  |  Jude  |  Revelation

Gospels

Section Contents:

  1. Matthew
  2. Mark
  3. Luke
  4. John
Four witnesses join together from different perspectives to testify to the life, teachings, death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ. All four witnesses come from eye witness accounts and testimonies, as well as from apostolic authority. They recount the historical accounts of Jesus' time on earth. Gospel is in itself a specific and special literary genre. Keep in mind as you read and study the gospels that each one has a different audience and a different goal in mind. The first three, called the Synoptic Gospels, generally tell Christ's life story in the same veins while John, writing later in history, focused in on new material not known in the previous three, some 90% new material.

Matthew

Book Introduction (PDF)  |  Short Outline (PDF)  |  Deep Study  |  Back to Top

Mark

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Luke

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John

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History

Section Contents:

  1. Acts
Acts gives us the history of the church as it begins. Luke, who wrote the companion volume in the third gospel, now shows us how the church fulfilled the same ministry that Christ engaged in while He was on earth. As in all of the books of the Bible that contain history, we must remember that Luke is not attempting to tell us everything that happened and when it happened, but rather focuses on historical accounts that help us understand the theology of how the church effectively perpetuated the gospel about Jesus.

Acts

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Pauline Epistles

Section Contents:

  1. Romans
  2. 1 Corinthians
  3. 2 Corinthians
  4. Galatians
  5. Ephesians
  6. Philippians
  7. Colossians
  8. 1 Thessalonians
  9. 2 Thessalonians
  10. 1 Timothy
  11. 2 Timothy
  12. Titus
  13. Philemon
No writer has written more books of the Bible than the persecutor-turned-apostle. His name is on 13 of the New Testament's books. Each of these is a letter, most to a church, but a couple to an individual. Paul discusses everything from theological principles to how to apply these principles. In almost all of his letters, he has a pattern of telling us the background (what is happening), the theological framework (what should be happening) and how to get there (the application). Paul's unique education and journeys made him a superstar apostle for Christ's kingdom, and his letters spur all believers on to greater life in Christ.

Romans

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1 Corinthians

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2 Corinthians

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Galatians

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Ephesians

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Philippians

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Colossians

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1 Thessalonians

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2 Thessalonians

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1 Timothy

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2 Timothy

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Titus

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Philemon

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General Epistles

Section Contents:

  1. Hebrews
  2. James
  3. 1 Peter
  4. 2 Peter
  5. 1 John
  6. 2 John
  7. 3 John
  8. Jude
These eight letters are called the General Epistles because their writers are more varied than in the Pauline Epistles. Five writers joined together to write these mostly shorter works to churches. It is not that these authors were less known or less authoritative, but that they did not write as many books as Paul. Luke actually wrote the most content in the New Testament. Many will include the final book, Revelation, in this group. However, Revelation has a clearly prophetic purpose and style, and so I have equated it to the Old Testament prophetic niche. The General Epistles are varied also in their approach. Some are wisdom literature, encouragement, teaching on the effectiveness of Christ's sacrifice and how He is better, and so on.

Hebrews

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James

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1 Peter

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2 Peter

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1 John

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2 John

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3 John

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Jude

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New Testament - Prophecy

Section Contents:

  1. Revelation
Although usually considered along with the General Epistles, Revelation is unique in the New Testament as an almost completely prophetic word for the Church that will last until its contents are fulfilled. For this reason, and John's purposeful allusions to Old Testament prophecy, the book stands in its own category of prophecy.

Revelation

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